‏‏ Car insurance rises by £50 under odd Brexit law enabling lawnmower claims - Mobilyardim

Car insurance rises by £50 under odd Brexit law enabling lawnmower claims


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You can now make a claim for scooter and golf cart accidents on private property and it will increase all our premiums unless the government passes a new law

Boris Johnson described the situation as “insane” – but there has been no real change

Car insurance premiums will rise by £50 per driver unless the government lives up to its promise to override a law so insane that it is being dumped in all European countries except Britain.

The premium increases will pay for an entirely new category of insurance claims filed against people who drive vehicles such as mobility scooters, ride-on mowers and golf buggies on private property.

Normally these shouldn’t have to be bought motorcycle insurance , which is only needed if vehicles are designed to take to the road.

But that all changed after a Slovenian farm worker named Damijan Vnuk was knocked off a ladder by a tractor on private land in August 2007 and injured.

He was unable to claim damages from the tractor’s insurer and the case thundered through Slovenian courts before going to the European Court of Justice in 2014.

That created a European rule that motor insurance was required for any vehicle, anywhere – not just on the road.







Now you can even claim scooters on your own property
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Image:

ElsvanderGun)

Each country in the European Union (EU) then had to write that technically in their own laws. Because of Brexit, Britain never did, meaning if you own something like a mobility scooter, you don’t really need to insure it.

But this is where things get complicated, because if you’re injured by a vehicle on private property in the UK, you can still make an insurance claim. That’s bad news for all of our auto insurance premiums.

That’s because in June 2019, another lawsuit, Lewis vs Tindale, said the UK state would have to pay for these claims even after Brexit.

The part of the state that pays these claims is the Auto Insurance Bureau (MIB) , which is funded by insurers and pays claims where the insurer cannot be traced.

But the final costs are picked up by motorists through their premiums.

According to the government’s own figures, the cost of paying these Vnuk claims will be more than £2 billion a year, or £50 a year per driver. The MIB is already paying out these claims as the news gets out.

On Feb. 21, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said the Vnuk rule would be reversed or it would “do only one thing: hit hard-working people across the country with an unnecessary increase in their car insurance”.

Graeme Trudgill, Executive Director of the British Insurance Brokers’ Association (BIBA), told The Mirror: “We welcomed the government’s announcement in February, but there is still no progress, and British motorists are paying for this when they shouldn’t. are.

“We are urging the UK government to prioritize a change to the motor insurance law.”

The situation is so insane that in June 2021 the EU said it would dump the whole thing.

Should Your Auto Insurer Be Liable for Lawn Mower Accidents? Let us know in the comments below

The European Parliament called it “absurd over-regulation”.

But because Britain now has left the EU “If we also want to get rid of the rule, we have to pass our own law, because new European rulings will not apply to us.

However, the government is not doing it.

This is despite Prime Minister Boris Johnson describing the Vnuk rule as “insane” back in 2017.

An MIB statement said: “Given these views, so forcefully expressed by the now Prime Minister, the DfT’s failure to remove Vnuk from UK law is surprising to say the least.”

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Transport told The Mirror this week: “We are determined to put forward the necessary legislation as soon as parliamentary time allows.”

On June 29, MP Peter Bone introduced a bill to private members called “Motor Vehicles (Compulsory Insurance)” that aims to change the law.

But this will most likely fail, as less than 5% of private member’s bills ever become law.

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